In the name of websites…sometimes less = MORE! Navigating what’s TOO much content for your web design

Navigating Website contentTraditionally, a website’s homepage has been treated like a book’s cover. When designing a website, marketers imagine that most of a website’s visitors will pass through the homepage enroute to their destination. This is bedrock conventional wisdom in the web design world. People want more, more and more, so why do they want to work less, less and less to get it? Many blogs and website owners are expressing concern over bounce rates. Even time on the site analytics are disturbingly short for content that should take longer to read or view. Unfortunately, the argument rages about content length, as it has, according to the following information, for years. Why is it so hard to pin down the problem? Because the web has changed and old content ideas are outdated.

Yes, it seems like no matter what you do, people still want it faster. If the customer is always right, then how do you provide them something that might be impossible? Sometimes it’s a matter of shaving off seconds from seeing and acting upon your content. Does content length really drive SEO? Are there other reasons people seem to bounce off a site so quickly. Is it true that people only read a small percentage of content? The answers aren’t surprising. What’s surprising is that the questions still exist.

There are people who believe that the bigger your content, either more images, videos or, most commonly, longer written content, the better for your SEO and keeping bounce rates down. There are also those who believe that it’s not about keeping people bouncing around your website but getting them in and then letting them find what they need and get out.

You’ve probably heard plenty of supporters who champion shorter posts, meaning posts that are around 200 words. This is perfectly acceptable if your blog has been created to sell a product of service. This is effective because you’re getting directly to the point with your call to action (CTA). If you want visitors to subscribe to a newsletter or email subscription, for example, keep it short and sweet. People have the tendency to have short attention spans and you don’t want them to forget the real reason why brought them to your blog.

That doesn’t mean that you can simply write a short blog post and call it a day. In fact, it may be more challenging to actually posts that are 200 words. But, if you can make all of your points and grab the attention of people, then go for it. But, how can you grab the attention of online surfers? After all, there have studies that have shown that most people only read between 20% to 28% of a post.

References:

Creating Content: How Much Is Too Much?. (2017). Retrieved on October 16, 2017, from http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/2013/06/creating-content-how-much-too-much/.

Is Too Much Content Making People Bounce From Your Website?. (2017). Retrieved on October 16, 2017, from https://webhostinggeeks.com/blog/is-too-much-content-making-people-bounce-from-your-website/.
Brusma Web Designs. (2017).

Three Scrolls and You’re Out: Too Much Content on One Page | Be …. Retrieved on October 16, 2017, from http://becircle.com/three_scrolls_and_youre_out.

Posted on: October 15, 2017brusma